Christmas 2004 Holiday Email Message:

<dc:title>Solar-Silico-Saline Therapy: Fad or Fantasy?</dc:title>
<dc:type>In press</dc:type>
<dc:creator>Treloar, Andrew</dc:creator>
<dc:date>Start 2004-12-23</dc:date>
<dc:date>End 2005-1-23</dc:date>
<dc:subject>ASRC 350201: Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services/
Business and Management/Human Resources Management</dc:subject>
<dc:subject>ASRC 350504: Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services/Tourism/Tourism Behaviour</dc:subject>
<dc:description>This paper describes a single-subject experiment involving a 180-degree work-life balance repolarisation, coupled with a zero-tolerance approach to the use of any form of information technology [1]. The research project builds on earlier research reported in [2]. The subject initially experienced feelings of loss of purpose, coupled with an ongoing desire to see if any new emails had arrived in the last minute, and what the latest slashdot (http://slashdot.org/) posting was about. After repeated courses of integrated solar-silico-saline therapy these symptoms diminished markedly. A side-effect, the desirability of which should perhaps be viewed as highly context and task-specific, was a reduced sense of the passage of time, or even of the importance of such passage. On return to work, it is believed that the subject will experience greater motivation, increased clarity of thought, and a better perspective on how to proactively manage an increasingly complex task portfolio. In addition, it is hoped that the subject will be more fun to work with. Due to the limited sample size, and the restricted experiment duration, more research will be required as a matter of urgency to validate these findings.</dc:description>
<dc:references>
1. Treloar, D. (2004). "Technology tough love - how I got my husband to go computer cold turkey", J. App. Spousal Mgt, Vol
32, Spring.
2. Treloar, A. (2003). "Sun, sand and surf - an innovative new treatment regime delivers real relaxed results", Int. J. Wellness, Vol 99, No 1
</dc:references>